Aquinas as Anglican

The following short essay appears in a new translation of a minor work of St. Thomas Aquinas: De Sortibus: A Letter to a Friend about the Casting of Lots, trans. Peter Carey (forthcoming in 2021 from Wipf &... Read More...

Tradition and Novelty: Eli and Samuel

By Sam Keyes At the start of 1 Samuel 3, the Old Testament lesson for the Second Sunday after Epiphany this year, we heard this startling line: “And the word of the Lord was rare in those days; there was no ... Read More...

“Translating” the Faith: The Lindisfarne Gospels

The Gospel of Jesus Christ has not stood still across the centuries, and neither have the Lindisfarne Gospels. When the monk penned Old English words on this gorgeous manuscript, his community was in exile, chased from their ancient home by Danish invaders. After the Norman invasion in 1066, monastic life in England grew quickly. A new priory was established on the tiny island, and the monks of Lindisfarne came home, bringing their Gospels with them. The English church would revolve around the life of monasteries like Lindisfarne for the next half millennium, counting on them to spread the good news to the English people.

Tradition for Teens

I wonder what personal attraction draws teenagers to traditional Catholic devotion?

Theology, Tradition, and Retrieval

“Theology always begins already in the middle.” It responds to the revelation of God, and it does so in particular times and places.

The Optional Bishop

An Anglican province bent on mission but without theological and historical depth will make for a weak, divided church.