Throwback Thursday 1: “Rebooting Anglican communication”

"We have lost the capacity to receive what is new," says Michael Poon. Hip as we are here at Covenant, we thought it might be fitting to tap into the general cultural expectation around Throwback Thursday, but subvert it a bit, highlighting some past contributions of enduring value.

Sufficient and required?

By Mary Tanner. What is it that constitutes recognisable identity amidst the myriad particularities of time and space?

Cranmer’s elegance and the wondrous exchange

By Brian Crowe. At the heart of the patristic witness is the “wondrous exchange” (admirabile commercium) — the Eternal Son becomes human so that human beings can become sons and daughter of the Father.

Covenants and fragments

By Ephraim Radner. The recently disclosed rupture in the relationship of the Rwandan House of Bishops and bishops of the Anglican Mission in the Americas, although hardly yet resolved or completely transparent, illumines at least a couple of key elements about ecclesial existence, especially among Anglicans.

Rebooting Anglican communication

By Michael Poon. Accountability and interdependence express our communal life: “one body, one Spirit, one hope, one Lord, one faith, one baptism, one God and Father” (Eph. 4:4-6).

Greeting the saints

By Victoria Matthews. What would happen if the provinces of the Communion were equally dedicated to being in relationship one with another, no matter what?

The Anglican Communion: A brief history lesson

By Robert W. Prichard. To find the beginnings of the Anglican Communion, one has to go to 1838 and the efforts of two bishops who were desirous of a closer relationship between the Church of England and the Episcopal Church.