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Covenant FAQs

At a time when Anglicans are disagreeing, we need to be reminded of what holds us together and what we think is important — including Christian mission.
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The Anglican Covenant

The Anglican Covenant, centering on mutual commitment, is intended to secure the future of the Communion as one body. The Covenant is the only credible proposal that I am aware of to help hold this family of churches together.
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‘Forceful’ fictions

Bishop Peter Selby, a member of the No Anglican Covenant Coalition, offered a paper that contained not only sloppy logic but also a rather curious mis-citation of the Covenant text.
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Primates raise urgent questions

“The primates may need to be more disciplined and intellectually constructive to tackle the order and unity questions in their future endeavors. Their credibility is on the line, perhaps in the same way that they see Canterbury’s authority undermined.”
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Greeting the saints

Through the deep, ongoing commitment to communication among the early Christians, even those whom Paul and others had yet to meet, Christians knew of each other’s lives and prayed for each other’s needs.
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Global South Primates issue statement

“We are wholeheartedly committed to the unity of Anglican Communion and recognize the importance of the historic See of Canterbury. Sadly, however, the Anglican Communion’s Instruments of Unity have become dysfunctional and no longer have the ecclesial and moral authority to hold the Communion together.”

Committing unity to print

By David Richardson. What the Covenant has to offer the churches of the Communion is an instrument of unity and mission which, in good Anglican fashion, steers a middle path between centralism and juridical structures on the one hand and unfettered license and mutual irresponsibility on the other. But it does more.