Catechesis

A catechism of Nature (4): The sea

What can the sea tell her, That she does not now know, and know how to bear? She knows, as the sea, that what came will recur, And detached in that wisdom, is aware How grain by slow grain, the last sun heat fr... Read More...

The burden of angels

A few months ago, I was in a conversation with a friend (a former classmate and now a fellow seminary professor at a different institution). She mentioned at some point that she didn't believe that angels reall... Read More...

On the harrowing of hell

Sam Keyes responds to a question submitted to the Covenant blog regarding the harrowing of hell.

The assumptions of the Assumption

On the face of it, Mary’s Assumption, body and soul, into heaven, is one of the most challenging traditions of the Church. One of my seminary professors loved to say that, for him, the Assumption was just too much of an assumption. It certainly presents a unique obstacle to many of our Protestant brethren. And this is in large part because the event does suggest, in a strange way, that the Resurrection and Ascension of Jesus wasn’t enough, that there had to be something more.

What the Ascension is (and isn’t)

The Ascension is a real departure and a real exaltation into the heavens. At the same time, we are sure that his body is present with us in mysteries and sacraments: in Eucharist and Baptism, in the gathered church, in particular saints.