Pandemic: 14th-Century Style

By John Bauerschmidt As the church continues to respond to the coronavirus and the disruption that has resulted, the historical memory of an earlier pandemic lurks in the back of the mind, ready to be brough... Read More...

Enmity

By John Bauerschmidt Enmity is defined as “deep-seated unfriendliness accompanied by readiness to quarrel or fight; hostility; antagonism” (Funk & Wagnall’s Standard College Dictionary). As a state of be... Read More...

Sympathetic Imagination

The process of entering into another age and another culture is not a strictly scientific one but requires imagination, the ability to call to mind people distant from us in time and place.

Baptismal Catechesis

I think that we have given the idea of lowering expectations about Christian identity and catechesis at the point of entry a thorough exploration over the past fifty years or so. The 1979 Prayer Book calls us to a different standard, to live more fully into the church’s vocation as a baptizing community.

St. John Henry Newman, a Shared Legacy

The canonization of John Henry Newman this year provides an opportunity for Anglicans to look back on his legacy in our own church. Newman was a priest of the Church of England before he was a cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church. In many ways, his contribution to both Anglicanism and Roman Catholicism is a legacy shared between the traditions.

ARCIC III, Walking Together on the Way: Learning to Be the Church—Local, Regional, Universal

ARCIC III is convinced that, just as a return to the sources of tradition in Scripture, liturgy, and the Patristic and Scholastic periods (ressourcement) has been renewing both Anglican and Roman Catholic theology since the middle of the last century, so critical self-examination through the prism of ecumenical dialogue and receptive learning can deepen the renewal and participation of the Church in the Trinitarian communion of God.