Negative Capability: A Pastoral Virtue

What does the poet John Keats have to teach the pastors of the church? John Bauerschmidt expands on a suggestion of Eugene Peterson, and suggests how we need to maximize  our “negative capability.”

C.S. Lewis: A Personal Appreciation

By John Bauerschmidt I can see it in the mind’s eye: my teenaged self, in a suburban strip mall bookstore, taking down a paperback volume from the rack and beginning to read. I am a cradle Episcopalian, a he... Read More...

Counterfactual

By John Bauerschmidt Philip K. Dick’s 1962 novel, The Man in the High Castle, posits an alternative history, set mostly in a Japanese occupied San Francisco after the Second World War, in which Japan and its... Read More...

A Scriptural Liturgy

By John Bauerschmidt In his book, The Love of Learning and the Desire for God, Jean Leclercq offers this reflection on liturgical worship: All the delicacy of liturgical poetry comes from the free and harmo... Read More...

The Wilderness Road

By John Bauerschmidt Back in the late spring, as the Episcopal Diocese of Tennessee prepared to emerge from our suspension of public in-person worship, I began to reflect anew on the next part of our life as... Read More...

William Bartram’s Travels

By John Bauerschmidt I first came to know of William Bartram in fictional form, as a minor character who appears at the beginning of Kenneth Robert’s novel Lydia Bailey. Bartram has what amounts to a cameo r... Read More...

Pandemic: 14th-Century Style

By John Bauerschmidt As the church continues to respond to the coronavirus and the disruption that has resulted, the historical memory of an earlier pandemic lurks in the back of the mind, ready to be brough... Read More...

Enmity

By John Bauerschmidt Enmity is defined as “deep-seated unfriendliness accompanied by readiness to quarrel or fight; hostility; antagonism” (Funk & Wagnall’s Standard College Dictionary). As a state of be... Read More...