Greeting the saints

By Victoria Matthews. What would happen if the provinces of the Communion were equally dedicated to being in relationship one with another, no matter what?

The Anglican Communion: A brief history lesson

By Robert W. Prichard. To find the beginnings of the Anglican Communion, one has to go to 1838 and the efforts of two bishops who were desirous of a closer relationship between the Church of England and the Episcopal Church.
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The 10th anniversary of 9/11

I believe that this is an Anglican moment — the kind of moment that comes along from time to time. It is a moment into which we can live fully, or it is a moment that we can let slip by.

Section 4: commitment in word and deed

By Andrew Goddard. The weakness of the Covenant lies not in the text and its alleged centralization but in the fact that many of the Covenant’s drafters and supporters now doubt that the standing committee and the instruments are sufficiently “fit for purpose.”

A Covenant of consideration

By John C. Bauerschmidt. Gathering is not simply a practical necessity for Christians: it is our vocation.

Choosing mutuality

By Alyson Barnett-Cowan. While it is true that the Communion’s language of “Covenant” was first used in The Windsor Report of 2004, the idea of having a comprehensive, coherent, agreed-upon understanding of how the Anglican family works has been around for a long time.

Eyeball-to-eyeball communion

By Thabo C. Makgoba. Perhaps the Covenant is not perfect — no human invention ever will be. But it is more than good enough. It has the potential to work well, if we are committed to making it do so.