Features

Recognizably Anglican

By George R. Sumner Mission must balance both adaptation and a careful guarding of what is authentically Christian.

Section 4: Commitment in Word and Deed

By Andrew Goddard The weakness of the Covenant lies not in the text and its alleged centralization but in the fact that many of the Covenant’s drafters and supporters now doubt that the standing committee and the instruments are sufficiently “fit for purpose.”

Committing Unity to Print

By David Richardson What the Covenant has to offer the churches of the Communion is an instrument of unity and mission which, in good Anglican fashion, steers a middle path between centralism and juridical structures on the one hand and unfettered license and mutual irresponsibility on the other. But it does more.

Belonging Together

By Geoffrey Rowell All ecclesiology is about our belonging together, and our belonging together in Christ.

Catholicity Outweighs Autonomy

By Paul Avis The future of the Anglican Communion is in jeopardy. The Anglican Covenant is the only credible proposal that I am aware of to help hold this family of churches together.

Embodying a Self-aware Anglicanism

By Matthew A. Gunter Confessions serve as symbols of belonging which give particular communities a shared identity. As such, they are sources of cohesion and delineate communal boundaries.

An Ardent Longing

By Christopher Wells I’ve found a remarkable bit of Victorian prophecy in a sermon, “The ‘Ardent Longing’ of the Anglican Communion for Peace and Unity” (1873), preached by the American missionary Bishop of Easton, Henry Lay, several years after the first Lambeth Conference.