From Nothing to Something

Tyler Clemmensen | Unsplash

By Pamela Lewis

A Reading from Genesis 1:1-2:3

1 In the beginning when God created the heavens and the earth, 2 the earth was a formless void and darkness covered the face of the deep, while a wind from God swept over the face of the waters. 3 Then God said, “Let there be light”; and there was light. 4 And God saw that the light was good; and God separated the light from the darkness. 5 God called the light Day, and the darkness he called Night. And there was evening and there was morning, the first day.

6 And God said, “Let there be a dome in the midst of the waters, and let it separate the waters from the waters.” 7 So God made the dome and separated the waters that were under the dome from the waters that were above the dome. And it was so. 8 God called the dome Sky. And there was evening and there was morning, the second day.

9 And God said, “Let the waters under the sky be gathered together into one place, and let the dry land appear.” And it was so. 10 God called the dry land Earth, and the waters that were gathered together he called Seas. And God saw that it was good. 11 Then God said, “Let the earth put forth vegetation: plants yielding seed, and fruit trees of every kind on earth that bear fruit with the seed in it.” And it was so. 12 The earth brought forth vegetation: plants yielding seed of every kind, and trees of every kind bearing fruit with the seed in it. And God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening and there was morning, the third day.

14 And God said, “Let there be lights in the dome of the sky to separate the day from the night; and let them be for signs and for seasons and for days and years, 15 and let them be lights in the dome of the sky to give light upon the earth.” And it was so. 16 God made the two great lights — the greater light to rule the day and the lesser light to rule the night — and the stars. 17 God set them in the dome of the sky to give light upon the earth, 18 to rule over the day and over the night, and to separate the light from the darkness. And God saw that it was good. 19 And there was evening and there was morning, the fourth day.

20 And God said, “Let the waters bring forth swarms of living creatures, and let birds fly above the earth across the dome of the sky.” 21 So God created the great sea monsters and every living creature that moves, of every kind, with which the waters swarm, and every winged bird of every kind. And God saw that it was good. 22 God blessed them, saying, “Be fruitful and multiply and fill the waters in the seas, and let birds multiply on the earth.” 23 And there was evening and there was morning, the fifth day.

24 And God said, “Let the earth bring forth living creatures of every kind: cattle and creeping things and wild animals of the earth of every kind.” And it was so. 25 God made the wild animals of the earth of every kind, and the cattle of every kind, and everything that creeps upon the ground of every kind. And God saw that it was good.

26 Then God said, “Let us make humankind in our image, according to our likeness; and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the birds of the air, and over the cattle, and over all the wild animals of the earth, and over every creeping thing that creeps upon the earth.”

27 So God created humankind in his image,
in the image of God he created them;
male and female he created them.

28 God blessed them, and God said to them, “Be fruitful and multiply, and fill the earth and subdue it; and have dominion over the fish of the sea and over the birds of the air and over every living thing that moves upon the earth.” 29 God said, “See, I have given you every plant yielding seed that is upon the face of all the earth, and every tree with seed in its fruit; you shall have them for food. 30 And to every beast of the earth, and to every bird of the air, and to everything that creeps on the earth, everything that has the breath of life, I have given every green plant for food.” And it was so. 31 God saw everything that he had made, and indeed, it was very good. And there was evening and there was morning, the sixth day.

1 Thus the heavens and the earth were finished, and all their multitude. 2 And on the seventh day God finished the work that he had done, and he rested on the seventh day from all the work that he had done. 3 So God blessed the seventh day and hallowed it, because on it God rested from all the work that he had done in creation.

Meditation

An amusing cartoon from 1977 by Brooklyn-born artist Sidney Harris shows two scientists standing at a blackboard looking at a complex mathematical problem, its numbers and symbols covering the board from end to end. At the center of the complicated problem are the words “Then a Miracle Occurs.” Pointing to these words, one scientist says to the other, “I think you should be more explicit here in Step Two.”

The math problem may relate to any of the various questions mathematicians and scientists scratch their heads over; but I like to think of it as referring to speculations about the origin of the universe, where the “spiritual” word, “miracle,” is in the midst of man’s complicated formulas. The universe is enormous and complex, but Genesis makes clear that God is the Creator who spoke everything into existence with the words “Let there be.” We are presented with his rational and orderly creative method: of course it makes sense on the first day to turn on the celestial lights before filling the planet with animals and vegetation; it is right that on the sixth day man and woman become the pinnacle of God’s creation and are given dominion over what he has made; and it is sensible that rest must follow labor.

The author of Genesis seeks to tell us that the world was created by God, as well as show us who God is. While distinct from his creation, he has endowed it with value, appraised it as “good,” and bestowed on us godly attributes of reason, creativity, and love.

We have known or will know the experience of bringing something out of nothing: starting over after a loss, creating a work of art that never before existed, or leaving a familiar place to begin a new life elsewhere. Our void-to-light experiences are continuations of the creation story, where God took a risk and chose to make something out of nothing and declared it good. Now that’s what we can call a miracle.

Pamela A. Lewis taught French for thirty years before retirement. A lifelong resident of Queens, N.Y., she attends Saint Thomas Church Fifth Avenue, and serves on various lay ministries. She writes for The Episcopal New YorkerEpiscopal Journal, and The Living Church.

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Iglesia Anglicana de Chile
Trinity Episcopal Church, Red Bank, N.J.

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