The Oct. 7 edition of The Living Church is available online to registered subscribers. In the cover essay, scholar Wilfred M. McClay writes:

There are many things that the world does not understand about teaching. One of them is this: those of us who do it, particularly primary and secondary teachers, are granted precious little time to step back and reflect together on the meaning of what it is we are doing — to take stock of what we are doing well, and what we need to do better. No profession needs it more, but there just never seems to be enough time for it. The demands of this job are voracious; they just keep coming at you, as incessant as the waves of the ocean, but far less majestic.

Indeed, there are times of year when the waves of demands begin to feel more like the incoming fire of some diabolical Space Invaders game that has somehow taken possession of your life. The challenges keep coming at you, keep multiplying and changing their shape and color and velocity and weaponry, at times lording it over every spare moment of every day. It seems to require all your energy just to scramble to do the things that have be done, and then collapse in a heap. You can easily lose perspective, become discouraged. Creativity, excitement, discovery, experimentation, curricular innovation, bold new ideas — all those great aspirations become endlessly deferred dreams, to be indulged, if ever, only “when things slow down.”


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