The September 21 edition of The Living Church is available online to registered subscribers. In “Feeding the Five Thousand,” church musician Jerry F. Davidson writes:

Frequently I use the metaphor of a professional chef who serves a large family. Food, like music, has both a practical and aesthetic facet: a certain quantity of food is absolutely necessary, but it may be good or bad food, and we may not all agree in our evaluations. A chef serving a large family has to contend with providing edible food three times a day for a group with varied tastes and needs. The infant can tolerate little more than milk, water, and pabulum. The senior adults will sometimes react very well to foie gras, cognac, and fine wines. No single meal served to all can possibly be expected to satisfy every family member completely. The chef must also consider nutrition because without it the family will suffer. In addition to balancing protein, carbohydrates, fats, vitamins, minerals, and roughage the successful family chef will have to consider what one wag called the “four teenage food groups”: sugar, salt, fats, and food coloring. Balance can be critical.

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