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Zachary Guiliano

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Zachary Guiliano is a Ph.D. candidate in medieval history at St. John’s College (University of Cambridge) and a Gates Cambridge Scholar. His academic interests include patristic exegesis and its reception, the relationship between the Church and political authority, and the role of scriptural interpretation (particularly allegorical exegesis) in ethical formation. His dissertation explores all of these topics, as it examines the composition, dissemination, and use of the Homiliary of Paul the Deacon, a collection of patristic homilies and sermons authorized by Charlemagne for use in the Daily Office and, later, for sermon construction. It would eventually become one of the most widely-used collections of patristic texts in the Middle Ages and beyond.

Before his arrival at Cambridge, Zachary completed his B.A. in Biblical Studies at Evangel University, and he earned his M.Div. at Harvard Divinity School. During his time at Harvard, he served as the Kellogg Fellow at the Episcopal Chaplaincy at Harvard, preaching regularly and providing opportunities for Christian formation. He is the author of a number of articles, short essays, and reviews, as well as co-editor with Charles M. Stang of The Open Body: Essays in Anglican Ecclesiology (Peter Lang, 2012), and co-editor with Cameron Partridge of Preaching and the Theological Imagination (Peter Lang, 2014), both of which appear in the new Studies in Episcopal and Anglican Theology series edited by C.K. Robertson.

He and his wife, Melissa, are natives of Peoria, Illinois, that most normal of American towns. They made their way to Anglicanism via a long pilgrimage through nearly every other Christian denomination, beginning with the Assemblies of God, a process which has given them a healthy regard for ecumenism, a love for good liturgy, and a significant appetite for theological discussion. They are, as well, studied practitioners of the culinary arts.

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