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Currently Browsing: Commentary
Aug
20

The assumptions of the Assumption

The assumptions of the Assumption On the face of it, Mary’s Assumption, body and soul, into heaven, is one of the most challenging traditions of the Church. One of my seminary professors loved to say that, for him, the Assumption was just too much of an assumption. It certainly presents a unique obstacle to many of our Protestant brethren. And this is in large part because the event does suggest, in a strange way, that the Resurrection and Ascension of Jesus wasn’t enough, that there had to be something more.
Aug
19

The future of the Church

The future of the Church The young people who comprise these choirs develop an ability (now rare) to articulate matters of faith with true conviction and confidence by praying and singing the Psalms and the great music of the Anglican tradition week in and week out and by being encouraged to think about the meaning of what they’re singing and to consider why a composer might have made the musical choices he did.
Aug
18

Common prayer and conflict

Common prayer and conflict Is boutique religion a lasting trend? Shall each congregation seek to fashion itself to cater to the delights of a significant number of local people to keep the doors open?
Aug
15

The assumption of labor

We bear hope that the present wounds in the Church might themselves herald the arrival of something ever old and ever new, the appearance of the City with eternal foundations. Indeed, we have faith that God wishes to build something out of the weeping ruins of our division.
Aug
15

Mary’s yes to God

While among Christians Jesus has escaped his detractors, his mother still carries the weight of human detraction, or perhaps worse still types of adoration that rob her of her humanity.
Aug
8

Teaching with power and love

For those who have been called to teaching, “we should not think it is sufficient for our salvation” if we shirk our duties in a time of theological malaise; it is not enough if we come up simply to the level of an “untaught crowd” (Bede, Homily 1.20). Make no mistake: the teachers of the Church will be judged for this turn.
Aug
6

Memory and delivery: World War I

Last Tuesday I had a morning with the Dorset Army Cadet Force, at their annual camp. I reminded them of a Russian proverb: "Dwell in the past and you’ll lose an eye. Forget the past and you’ll lose both eyes." We are here today to remember.
Jul
25

The Anglican way

I shall seek to write down that which I believe to be the essence of Anglicanism. None of the elements I note are in themselves the exclusive property of our tradition, but taken together they express what our church—with a small c—has sought be at its best.
Jul
18

Apostolic sacrifice

We never read apart from our experience of the rest of life. My own reading of A Brutal Unity was overshadowed by an exciting but overwhelming task whose discharging lay just on the other side of the Covenant retreat in La Porte.
Jul
17

Let conscience go

The whole notion, which shows up with dogmatic insistency in A Brutal Unity, that conscience is something that can and should be sacrificed will appear to many Christians as an incomprehensible foreign intrusion into what we take to be the very essence of Christian existence.
Jul
16

Tough medicine

The Covenant Seminar was just what I needed. Of course, the fellowship was delightful: to form new bonds of friendship and renew old ones is a valuable thing in itself. The beautiful setting, reverent worship, and time away from my parish all worked their medicinal effects.
Jul
15

Reading Radner (part 1)

Of all the delights in the day-to-day work of the Living Church Foundation, the greatest may be the opportunity we have to encourage and give voice to young leaders in the Church, and to be challenged and refreshed by them in turn.
Jul
7

Anglicans and confession

You can confess to an Anglican priest.
Jun
26

On the Octave of Corpus Christi

As I was traveling on Corpus Christi itself, I didn’t have a chance to post something useful or interesting. I offer this for the Octave: a selected translation from the De institutione clericorum of Rabanus Maurus, Abbot of Fulda and Archbishop of Mainz (d. 856). This work was one of those handbooks of ‘basic’ doctrine made in the Carolingian era and frequently used for the instruction...

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