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Currently Browsing: Commentary
Jul
25

The Anglican way

Crossposted from Shreds and Patches, Tony Clavier writes: I shall seek to write down that which I believe to be the essence of Anglicanism. None of the elements I note are in themselves the exclusive property of our tradition, but taken together they express what our church—with a small c—has sought be at its best. As such, these elements are always aspirational rather than accomplished ideals....
Jul
18

Apostolic sacrifice

We never read apart from our experience of the rest of life. My own reading of A Brutal Unity was overshadowed by an exciting but overwhelming task whose discharging lay just on the other side of the Covenant retreat in La Porte.
Jul
17

Let conscience go

The whole notion, which shows up with dogmatic insistency in A Brutal Unity, that conscience is something that can and should be sacrificed will appear to many Christians as an incomprehensible foreign intrusion into what we take to be the very essence of Christian existence.
Jul
16

Tough medicine

The Covenant Seminar was just what I needed. Of course, the fellowship was delightful: to form new bonds of friendship and renew old ones is a valuable thing in itself. The beautiful setting, reverent worship, and time away from my parish all worked their medicinal effects.
Jul
15

Reading Radner (part 1)

Of all the delights in the day-to-day work of the Living Church Foundation, the greatest may be the opportunity we have to encourage and give voice to young leaders in the Church, and to be challenged and refreshed by them in turn.
Jul
7

Anglicans and confession

You can confess to an Anglican priest.
Jun
26

On the Octave of Corpus Christi

As I was traveling on Corpus Christi itself, I didn’t have a chance to post something useful or interesting. I offer this for the Octave: a selected translation from the De institutione clericorum of Rabanus Maurus, Abbot of Fulda and Archbishop of Mainz (d. 856). This work was one of those handbooks of ‘basic’ doctrine made in the Carolingian era and frequently used for the instruction...
Jun
16

Bad art and the Church

I am somewhat surprised to find myself defending the use of “bad” art, at least in religious settings, and I should admit from the beginning that I write in partial hope of persuading myself in the wake of Trinity Sunday, when we’ve realized the degree to which our conceptions fail to grasp the mystery of God’s being.
Jun
7

What the Ascension is (and isn’t)

The Ascension is a real departure and a real exaltation into the heavens. At the same time, we are sure that his body is present with us in mysteries and sacraments: in Eucharist and Baptism, in the gathered church, in particular saints.
May
30

Jordan Hylden, ECF Fellow 2014

Jordan Hylden, a contributor to The Living Church and its weblog, Covenant, is among the Episcopal Church Foundation’s 2014 Fellows.
May
21

Order, administration, and God

Sometimes, God seems curiously concerned with order. This aspect of God’s character, as portrayed in Scripture, is not frequently emphasized in much contemporary theology.
May
15

Confusions, holidays, and greed

Among the many confusions of living abroad, none strikes me so often as keeping track of holidays. You don’t realize how accustomed you are to the rhythm of a particular national calendar, until it is changed, and you find yourself celebrating Mother’s Day on the wrong Sunday or waking up and not realizing it’s a ‘Bank Holiday’ until you go to pick up your dry cleaning and the shop is closed.
Apr
17

Poor Peter

Peter’s qualification to lead was not based on his talents or suitability, his virtue or freedom from error, but simply on his vocation, his calling.
Apr
12

Lest we forget

We do need to go to dark Calvary before we approach Resurrection. Resurrection isn’t reinvention. It can only be understood in the light of all that went before, immediately before and in the story of Israel’s relationship with her God.

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