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Jul
25

The Anglican way

Crossposted from Shreds and Patches, Tony Clavier writes: I shall seek to write down that which I believe to be the essence of Anglicanism. None of the elements I note are in themselves the exclusive property of our tradition, but taken together they express what our church—with a small c—has sought be at its best. As such, these elements are always aspirational rather than accomplished ideals....
Jun
26

On the Octave of Corpus Christi

As I was traveling on Corpus Christi itself, I didn’t have a chance to post something useful or interesting. I offer this for the Octave: a selected translation from the De institutione clericorum of Rabanus Maurus, Abbot of Fulda and Archbishop of Mainz (d. 856). This work was one of those handbooks of ‘basic’ doctrine made in the Carolingian era and frequently used for the instruction...
Jun
16

Bad art and the Church

I am somewhat surprised to find myself defending the use of “bad” art, at least in religious settings, and I should admit from the beginning that I write in partial hope of persuading myself in the wake of Trinity Sunday, when we’ve realized the degree to which our conceptions fail to grasp the mystery of God’s being.
Jun
7

What the Ascension is (and isn’t)

The Ascension is a real departure and a real exaltation into the heavens. At the same time, we are sure that his body is present with us in mysteries and sacraments: in Eucharist and Baptism, in the gathered church, in particular saints.
May
29

Ascension song

The riven earth trembles / As up-bearing angels / Host him unaware / Who dashed foot and hand and heart / With five open wounds, / Wine-staining his garments red / A shame to Massless spirits.
May
21

Order, administration, and God

Sometimes, God seems curiously concerned with order. This aspect of God’s character, as portrayed in Scripture, is not frequently emphasized in much contemporary theology.
May
15

Confusions, holidays, and greed

Among the many confusions of living abroad, none strikes me so often as keeping track of holidays. You don’t realize how accustomed you are to the rhythm of a particular national calendar, until it is changed, and you find yourself celebrating Mother’s Day on the wrong Sunday or waking up and not realizing it’s a ‘Bank Holiday’ until you go to pick up your dry cleaning and the shop is closed.
Aug
24

Abp. Welby’s priority: prayer

To raise a call to prayer, to make it one’s priority beyond all other things, is to declare that prayer has, in some sense, been devalued of late or even abandoned in favor of other activities or no activity.
Apr
13

Keeping Easter in a world of change

My early formation as an Episcopalian was shaped to a large extent by the first person I ever felt confident in calling “my priest.” Among his many notable features, I learned much from the way he kept Easter. He would remind us Sunday after Sunday, from our Easter Vigil onwards, that we were still in the “great fifty days” and that Easter had not ended in any sense. Our celebration was ongoing....
Mar
26

The enemies of the cross

“For many walk as enemies of the cross of Christ…” We have now entered Holy Week and have begun our intense contemplation of the passion and cross of our Lord Jesus Christ. The season of Lent is ending, but this reading from Philippians assigned for the Daily Office presses upon us precisely as our time of denial draws nearer to its appointed end, to its climax and completion in the Triduum. At...
Mar
2

Return to your first love

I would like to think that we have not become so warped by our passions and by a reliance on our controversies to sustain our interest in one another, in Anglican forms of Christian faith, and, ultimately, in Christ. But I fear we may have. And so I must recall to us all, those resonant words from Christ: “I have this against you, that you have abandoned your first love.”
Sep
1

Authority and invisible activities

For the last several years, it has been my habit to keep abreast of news in the Roman Catholic community for what may be obvious reasons: they are the largest organized Christian body in the world, and what they do and don’t do, what they say and don’t say, inevitably affects our our work and witness.
Sep
10

Zachary Guiliano

Zachary Guiliano is a Ph.D. candidate in medieval history at St. John’s College (University of Cambridge) and a Gates Cambridge Scholar.

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