We thought some readers might find themselves subject to a few “fits and starts” at the beginning of Lent, to borrow Fr. Calvin Lane’s fine and recent phrase about faltering Lenten discipline. So, herewith, a few book ideas for those of you still struggling to find the “perfect” volume. You’ll notice a some commonalities (Rowan Williams, Hans Urs von Balthasar, Joseph Ratzinger, Gary Anderson) and surprising divergences.

 

John Bauerschmidt

  • Billy Collins, Horoscopes for the Dead
  • Gerhard von Rad, Deuteronomy
  • Ephraim Radner, Hope among the Fragments

Charlie Clauss

  • Rowan Williams, The Lion’s World: A Journey into the Heart of Narnia

Stewart Clem

  • Markus Rathey, Bach’s Major Vocal Works: Music, Drama, Liturgy 
  • Calvin Stapert, My Only Comfort: Death, Deliverance, and Discipline in the Music of Bach

Zachary Guiliano

  • Hans Urs von Balthasar, Mysterium Paschale: The Mystery of Easter, trans. by Aidan Nichols
  • Joseph Ratzinger, Jesus of Nazareth
  • Justin Welby, Dethroning Mammon

Benjamin Guyer

  • Psalms

Cole Hartin

  • George Herbert, The Temple
  • St. Macarius the Spiritbearer: Coptic Texts Relating to St. Macarius the Great, translation by Tim Vivian

Wesley Hill

  • Christopher Ash, Job: The Wisdom of the Cross
  • Rowan Williams, The Sign and the Sacrifice: The Meaning of the Cross and Resurrection

Jordan Hillebert

  • Julian of Norwich, Revelations of Divine Love
  • Rowan Williams, The Sign and the Sacrifice: The Meaning of the Cross and Resurrection

Richard Kew

  • Julia Baird, Victoria: The Queen.
  • Douglas Harink, 1 & 2 Peter, Brazos Theological Commentary
  • John Moorman, History of the Church in England (3rd edition)

Calvin Lane

  • Thomas à Kempis, The Complete Imitation of Christ, translation and commentary by Fr. John Julian, OJN

Jean Meade

  • Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

Neal Michell

  • C.H. Dodd, Benefits of His Passion
  • Niall Ferguson, The Rise and Decline of the British Empire
  • David Goodhew (ed.), Growth and Decline in the Anglican Communion, 1980 to the Present
  • Mark Schweizer, The Alto Wore Tweed

Jonathan Mitchican

  • Alexander Schmemann, Great Lent: Journey to Pascha
  • P. Mellick Belshaw, Lent with Evelyn Underhill

Bryan Owen

  • N.T. Wright, The Day the Revolution Began: Reconsidering the Meaning of Jesus’s Crucifixion

Andrew Petiprin

  • Nathaniel Hawthorne, The House of the Seven Gables
  • Roger Scruton, On Human Nature

Sarah Puryear

  • Tim Muldoon, The Ignatian Workout for Lent: 40 Days of Prayer, Reflection, and Action

Joey Royal

  • Gary Anderson, Charity: The Place of the Poor in the Biblical Tradition
  • Gary Anderson, Sin: A History

Christopher Yoder

  • Rowan Williams, The Sign and the Sacrifice: The Meaning of the Cross and Resurrection.

Paul Wheatley

  • Gary Anderson, Sin: A History
  • Fleming Rutledge, The Crucifixion

Clint Wilson

  • Hans Urs von Balthasar, Mysterium Paschale: The Mystery of Easter, translation by Aidan Nichols
  • Joseph Ratzinger, Jesus of Nazareth
  • Donna Schaper (ed.), 40-Day Journey with Howard Thurman

About The Author

In continuous publication since 1878, The Living Church served throughout the 20th century as the Catholic-minded magazine of record in the Episcopal Church in the United States, in firm support of the advancing ecumenical movement and the rise of a global, interdependent Anglican Communion.

In the 21st century, it remains focused on the whole state of Christ’s Church, amid major shifts in the landscape and culture of global Christianity. We are champions of a covenanted Anglican Communion as a means of healing the wounds of division in the body of Christ.

The members of the governing Foundation and Board of the Living Church are communion-minded and -committed Anglicans from several nations, devoted to seeking and serving the full, visible unity of Christ’s one, holy, catholic, and apostolic Church.

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