The Hymn Society in the United States and Canada has arranged free two-month use of various hymns after a crisis.

In describing its “Hymns in Times of Crisis,” the society says on its website:

When tragedy strikes, we often find ourselves at a loss for words to express our sorrow, rage, and helplessness. When a community needs to gather, congregational song can be a powerful force to help us express what we cannot articulate ourselves. It can be a healing, unifying force.

If your church community or a member of your community is experiencing a time of crisis due to death, natural disaster, family struggles, or any other time when singing these songs can help, The Hymn Society in the United States and Canada offers this resource of hymns with suggested tunes which can be useful at these times. The publishers, authors and composers have graciously granted permission for you to use any of the hymns in this collection at no royalty cost to you for 2 months following the crisis, and at any memorial or remembrance service held within 1 year of the event. These texts may also be used for personal devotions and group discussion. If your church is a member of OneLicense.net or CCLI, you are encouraged to report your usage there as you would customarily do.

Marilyn Haskel, a St. Paul’s Chapel music associate at Trinity Wall Street and a member at large of the society, was a member of the project task group for “Hymns in Times of Crisis.”

The mission of the society, founded in 1922, is to encourage, promote, and enliven congregational singing. The society will hold its annual conference July 17-21 in Redlands, California.

The society plans to launch a Center for Congregational Song, based in Dallas, in October. Brian Hehn, who joined the society’s staff in September 2015, will be the first director of CCS. The society says that CCS will be a hub for education and outreach and an online platform connecting people to vital resources on congregational song.

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